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IB Information · School profile

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME IN VILNIUS LYCEUM

IB MISSION STATEMENT.

IB LEARNER PROFILE.

IB IN VILNIUS LYCEUM.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE COURSES OFFERED.

ASSESSMENT.

FEES.

ADMISSION.

CONTACT DETAILS.

RESULTS ACHIEVED IN PREVIOUS YEARS.




The IB Diploma programme is a course designed for students aged 16 to 19. It is an academically challenging and balanced programme of education with final examinations that prepares students for success at university and life beyond. The programme is normally taught over two years and has gained recognition and respect from the world's leading universities.



IB MISSION STATEMENT

The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment. These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.



IB LEARNER PROFILE

The aim of all IB programmes is to develop internationally minded people who, recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world.


As IB learners we strive to be:

Inquirers

We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. We know how to learn independently and with others. We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our love of learning throughout life.

Knowledgeable

We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global significance.

Thinkers

We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take responsible action on complex problems. We exercise initiative in making reasoned, ethical decisions.

Communicators

We express ourselves confidently and creatively in more than one language and in many ways. We collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and groups.

Principled

We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of people everywhere. We take responsibility for our actions and their consequences.

Open-minded

We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the experience.

Caring

We show empathy, compassion and respect. We have a commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and in the world around us.

Risk-takers

We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; and we work independently to explore new ideas and innovative strategies. We are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenges and change.

Balanced

We understand the importance of balancing different aspects of our lives - intellectual, physical and emotional - to achieve well-being for ourselves and others. We recognize our interdependence with other people and with the world in which we live.

Reflective

We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development.


IB IN VILNIUS LYCEUM


In Vilnius Lyceum, the IB diploma programme was started in 1997. We have grown from an initial class of 7 to our current group of 80 Diploma candidates. Our success rate for earning the IB Diploma has been 100% over the most recent years.

The following are the subjects offered for 2016-2018

 

Subject Area

Subjects

Group 1

Studies in Language and Literature

Lithuanian A: Literature; English A: Language and Literature

Group 2

Language Acquisition

English B, German B, French B, French Ab Initio, Spanish Ab Initio

Group 3

Individuals & Societies

History, Psychology, Economics, Geography

Group 4

Experimental Sciences

Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Environmental Systems, Computer Science

Group 5

Mathematics

Mathematics

Group 6

Electives

a second subject from Groups 2 - 4


Candidates for the diploma study six subjects selected from the subject groups. Normally three subjects are studied at higher level (courses representing 240 teaching hours), and the remaining three subjects are studied at standard level (courses representing 150 teaching hours). All three parts of the core - extended essay, theory of knowledge (TOK) and creativity, action, service (CAS) - are compulsory and are central to the philosophy of the Diploma Programme.

English is the language of instruction.

The extended essay has a prescribed limit of 4,000 words. It offers the opportunity to investigate a topic of individual interest, and acquaints students with the independent research and writing skills expected at university.

The interdisciplinary Theory of Knowledge (TOK) course is designed to provide coherence by exploring the nature of knowledge across disciplines, encouraging an appreciation of other cultural perspectives.

Participation in the school's Creativity, action, service (CAS) programme encourages students to be involved in artistic pursuits, sports and community service work, thus fostering students' awareness and appreciation of life outside the academic arena.



BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE COURSES OFFERED

GROUP 1.

Group 1 language and literature study courses are designed to support future academic study by developing high levels of language competence and communication skills as well as social, aesthetic and cultural literacy. Group1 courses are suitable for students who have experience of using the language in an academic context.
In the Language A: literature course, focus is directed towards developing an understanding of the techniques involved in literary criticism and promoting the ability to form independent literary judgments. Through the study of a wide range of literature, the course encourages students to appreciate the artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and by considering a range of critical approaches.
Students can take Lithuanian A: literature at HL and SL; a school supported self-taught option in language A: literature at SL is offered in other languages.

Language A: language and literature course comprises four partsā€”two relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. The course aims to develop in students skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can be seen as autonomous yet simultaneously related to culturally determined reading practices. A key aim is to encourage students to focus closely on the language of the texts they study and to become aware of the role of each text's wider context in shaping its meaning.
Students can take English A: language and literature at HL and SL.

GROUP 2

Group 2 language acquisition courses are designed to provide students with the necessary skills and intercultural competence that will enable them to communicate successfully in an environment where the language studied is spoken.
Language B is a course for students with some background in the target language. While learning this additional language, students also explore the culture(s) connected to it. SL and HL are differentiated by the depth of syllabus coverage, the study of literature at HL, the level of difficulty and the demands of assessment. Students can take English B, German B, French B at HL and SL.
The language ab initio is a course for students with little or no experience of the language. It is organized around three themes; each theme has a list of topics that provide the students with opportunities to practice and explore the language as well as to develop intercultural competence. Through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills, students acquire the ability to respond and interact appropriately in a defined range of everyday situations. The language ab initio course is offered in German, French and Spanish at SL only.

GROUP 3

The study of the IB Economics is essentially about the concept of scarcity and the problem of resource allocation.Ā  A certain methodology is employed that can be summarized as a progression from problem identification, through hypothesis formulation and testing, arriving finally at a conclusion. Alongside the empirical observations of positive economics, students of the subject are asked to formulate normative questions. Encouraging students to explore such questions forms the central focus of the economics course. No particular background in terms of specific subjects studied is expected or required and no prior knowledge of economics is necessary for students to undertake a course of study based on this specification. However, a familiarity with economic concepts would be an advantage. The following topics are studied: introduction to economics, microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics.

Geography is a dynamic subject that is firmly grounded in the real world and focuses on the interactions between individuals, societies and the physical environment in both time and space. It seeks to identify trends and patterns in these interactions and examines the processes behind them. It also investigates the way that people adapt and respond to change and evaluates management strategies associated with such change. Geography describes and helps to explain the similarities and differences between spaces and places. These may be defined on a variety of scales and from a range of perspectives. Within group 3 subjects, geography is distinctive in that it occupies the middle ground between social sciences and natural sciences. The Diploma Programme geography course integrates both physical and human geography, and ensures that students acquire elements of both scientific and socio economic methodologies. Geography takes advantage of its position between both these groups of subjects to examine relevant concepts and ideas from a wide variety of disciplines. This helps students develop an appreciation of, and a respect for, alternative approaches, viewpoints and ideas.

The IB History course is a world history course based on a comparative and multi-perspective approach to history. It involves the study of a variety of types of history, including political, economic, social and cultural, and provides a balance of structure and flexibility. The course emphasizes the importance of encouraging students to think historically and to develop historical skills as well as gaining factual knowledge. It puts a premium on developing the skills of critical thinking, and on developing an understanding of multiple interpretations of history. In this way, the course involves a challenging and demanding critical exploration of the past.

Students at standard level (SL) and higher level (HL) are presented with a syllabus that has a common core consisting of the prescribed subject (The move to global war) and a number of topics related to the 19th and 20th century Europe. While many of the skills of studying history are common to both SL and HL, the difference in recommended teaching hours at SL and HL signals a clear distinction between the demands made on students, with the greater depth of study required for HL.

The IB Psychology examines the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behaviour, thereby adopting an integrative approach. Understanding how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied enables students to achieve a greater understanding of themselves and appreciate the diversity of human behaviour. The ethical concerns raised by the methodology and application of psychological research are key considerations in IB psychology. No prior study of psychology is expected. No particular background in terms of specific subjects studied is expected or required of students. The skills needed for the psychology course are developed during the course itself.


GROUP 4

A common curriculum model applies to all the Diploma programme group 4 subjects: biology, chemistry, and physics. Students at both SL and HL study a core syllabus, and this is supplemented by the study of options. Students at HL also study additional higher level) material.Ā  Students at SL are required to spend 40 hours, and students at HL 60 hours, on practical/investigative work. This includes 10 hours for the group 4 project. All the experimental science courses provide opportunities for scientific study and creativity; enable students to apply and use scientific methods and techniques; develop an ability to analyze, evaluate and synthesize scientific information; develop experimental and investigative scientific skills; raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology, etc.

In the IB Biology course, it is hoped that students will acquire a limited body of facts and, at the same time, develop a broad, general understanding of the principles of the subject. There are four basic biological concepts that run throughout: structure and function, universality versus diversity, equilibrium within systems, evolution. The following core topics are offered: statistical analysis, cells, the chemistry of life, genetics, ecology and evolution, human health and physiology.
The IB Physics course represents physics as a fundamental science. It allows students to develop traditional practical skills and techniques and to increase facility in the use of mathematics, which is the language of physics. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills, and information and communication technology skills. The following core topics are studied: physics and physical measurement, mechanics, thermal physics, oscillations and waves, electric currents, fields and forces, atomic and nuclear physics, energy, power and climate change; options, such as thermal physics, electromagnetic induction, wave phenomena, or quantum physics and nuclear physics.

The IB Chemistry course represents an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigational skills. Apart from being a subject worthy of study in its own right, chemistry is a prerequisite for many other courses in higher education, such as medicine, biological science and environmental science, and serves as useful preparation for employment. The course includes the essential principles of the subject; the core topics studied are quantitative chemistry, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding, energetics, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, organic chemistry, measurement and data processing,

Environmental systems is an interdisciplinary group 3 and 4 course that is offered only at standard level (SL). Students can study ESS and have it count as either a group 3 or a group 4 course. ESS is firmly grounded in both a scientific exploration of environmental systems in their structure and function and in the exploration of cultural, economic, ethical, political, and social interactions of societies with the environment. Students will become equipped with the ability to recognize and evaluate the impact of our complex system of societies on the natural world. The course requires a broad skill set from students and includes the ability to perform research and investigations and to participate in philosophical discussion. Through the exploration of cause and effect, the course investigates how values interact with choices and actions, resulting in a range of environmental impacts. Students develop an understanding that the connections between environmental systems and societies are diverse, varied and dynamic.

Computer science requires an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computational thinking as well as knowledge of how computers and other digital devices operate. The Diploma Programme computer science course is engaging, accessible, inspiring and rigorous. It has the following characteristics. draws on a wide spectrum of knowledge; enables and empowers innovation, exploration and the acquisition of further knowledge; interacts with and influences cultures, society and how individuals and societies behave; raises ethical issues; is underpinned by computational thinking.
Computational thinking involves the ability to: think procedurally, logically, concurrently, abstractly, recursively and think ahead; utilize an experimental and inquiry-based approach to problem-solving; develop algorithms and express them clearly; appreciate how theoretical and practical limitations affect the extent to which problems can be solved computationally.
During the course the student will develop computational solutions. This will involve the ability to: identify a problem or unanswered question; design, prototype and test a proposed solution; liaise with clients to evaluate the success of the proposed solution and make recommendations for future developments.

GROUP 5

The IB Mathematics SL course caters for students who already possess knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who are equipped with the skills needed to apply simple mathematical techniques correctly. The majority of these students will expect to need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for future studies in subjects such as chemistry, economics, psychology and business administration. The course focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical techniques. The intention is to introduce students to these concepts in a comprehensible and coherent way, rather than insisting on mathematical rigour. Students should wherever possible apply the mathematical knowledge they have acquired to solve realistic problems set in an appropriate context.

The IB Mathematics HL course caters for students with a good background in mathematics who are competent in a range of analytical and technical skills. The majority of these students will be expecting to include mathematics as a major component of their university studies, either as a subject in its own right or within courses such as physics, engineering and technology. Others may take this subject because they have a strong interest in mathematics and enjoy meeting its challenges and engaging with its problems. The nature of the subject is such that it focuses on developing important mathematical concepts in a comprehensible, coherent and rigorous way. This is achieved by means of a carefully balanced approach. Students are encouraged to apply their mathematical knowledge to solving problems set in a variety of meaningful contexts. Development of each topic should feature justification and proof of results. Students embarking on this course should expect to develop insight into mathematical form and structure, and should be intellectually equipped to appreciate the links between concepts in different topic areas. They should also be encouraged to develop the skills needed to continue their mathematical growth in other learning environments.


ASSESSMENT


Students are graded on the 7-grade scale, where 7 is the highest grade. Grades are awarded for oral and written activities, projects, experimental work, etc. in the course of a semester. At the end of each semester, students are given the grade average (or semester grade) in each subject. At the end of a school year, students are given final grades which are averages of semester and school exam grades.

Internal assessment

In all subjects, at least some of the assessment is carried out following the requirements of the IB diploma programme. Internal assessment is conducted by teachers, who mark individual pieces of work produced as part of a course of study. The grading system is criterion based, and assessment criteria applied are established by the IBO. Internal assessment grades are externally moderated and make up from 20 to 30 per cent of the final examination grade. Examples of this kind of assessment include oral exercises and class presentations (in language subjects), essays, portfolios, practical laboratory work, mathematical investigations, etc.

External assessment

Some assessment tasks are conducted and supervised by teachers without the restrictions of examination conditions, but are then marked externally by examiners. Examples include written tasks for Languages A and B, an essay for Theory of Knowledge and an Extended Essay.
It is externally marked examinations that form the greatest share of the assessment for each subject because of the greater degree of objectivity and reliability provided by the standard examination environment.
The grading system is criterion based with a scale from 1 (minimum) to 7 (maximum) points. The award of the Diploma requires a minimum total of 24 points, and a satisfactory completion of the Extended Essay, TOK and CAS.


FEES

The municipality covers the cost of the IBO membership fee. IB students, however, have to pay examination fees to the IBO (approximately 610 EUR).


ADMISSION


To be admitted as IB Diploma candidates, students must have completed basic secondary education and have to pass entrance exams arranged at Vilnius Lyceum.


Students have to take two exams: English (first language or second language) and Mathematics.


Examination Syllabuses and Samples will be available on the website www.licejus.lt

Admission in 2017

Application form filled in by a student and a school transcript with latest grades should be submitted from April 4 to 21; the form will be available on the website www.licejus.lt; applications and scanned transcripts may be sent by e-mail to the IB Coordinator's address ib@licejus.lt

Entrance exams will be held on May 13th (Saturday); students who study outside Lithuania in 2016/17 will be able to sit the exams on July 3rd (Monday).



CONTACT DETAILS

Vilija Balčiūnaitė, IB Coordinator, ib@licejus.lt

Address: Vilnius Lyceum, Širvintų 82, Vilnius LT-08216, Lithuania, tel./fax (370 5)277 58 36


RESULTS ACHIEVED IN PREVIOUS YEARS

RESULTS ACHIEVED IN PREVIOUS YEARS

2013

2014

2015

2016

Number of cadidates

38

40

37

27

Average points obtained by candidates

36

37

35

35

Highest diploma points awarded

44

44

45

44

Average grade obtained by candidates

5.53

5.84

5.67

5.6

International Baccalaureate Examinations: May 2014 and May 2015, May 2016

Subject Level Number of candidates Average Grade
(School)
Average Grade
(Worldwide)

2014

2015

2016

2014

2015

2016

2014

2015

2016

LITHUANIAN A: Lit

HL

14

11

9

5.93

6.18

6.56

5.50

5.93

5.85

LITHUANIAN A: Lit

SL

24

24

18

5.96

5.92

5.72

5.83

5.54

5.54

ENGLISH A: Lang &Lit

HL

9

8

7

5.56

5.25

5.00

5.10

5.09

5.05

ENGLISH B

HL

30

27

20

6.23

6.07

6.35

5.70

5.72

5.70

GERMAN B

SL

1

4

-

7.00

5.75

-

5.21

5.16

-

FRENCH AB

SL

2

7

1

6.50

6.29

5.00

5.02

5.03

4.50

FRENCH B

SL

3

1

-

5.67

6.00

-

4.92

4.89

-

FRENCH B

HL

1

-

2

7.00

-

7.00

5.30

-

5.27

SPANISH AB

SL

-

-

7

-

-

5.71

-

-

5.10

HISTORY. EUROPE

HL

8

6

8

5.75

5.33

5.75

4.73

4.79

4.84

HISTORY

SL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

PSYCHOLOGY

HL

2

2

-

5.50

5.50

-

4.64

4.67

-

PSYCHOLOGY

SL

8

6

11

5.86

4.33

5.18

4.40

4.36

4/32

ECONOMICS

HL

8

7

4

6.13

5.86

5.00

5.17

5.14

5.12

ECONOMICS

SL

10

3

3

6.40

6.33

6.33

4.70

4.66

4.64

GEOGRAPHY

HL

2

1

5

5.50

6.00

5.20

5.23

5.23

5.21

GEOGRAPHY

SL

10

14

5

5.67

5.93

5.00

4.66

4.69

4.71

BIOLOGY

HL

7

10

6

5.86

5.30

6.33

4.31

4.34

4.32

BIOLOGY

SL

9

8

3

5.67

5.75

5.67

4.26

4.25

4.24

CHEMISTRY

HL

13

10

11

5.69

4.80

5.55

4.52

4.49

4.47

CHEMISTRY

SL

9

11

6

5.67

5.36

5.17

4.01

4.05

3.93

PHYSICS

HL

9

4

5

5.56

5.25

4.80

4.64

4.69

4.60

PHYSICS

SL

8

6

7

6.13

5.67

4.29

4.16

4.19

4.04

COMPUTER SCIENCE

HL

3

4

1

6.00

5.50

4.00

4.50

4.38

4.25

COMPUTER SCIENCE

SL

6

2

1

4.33

5.00

3.50

4.20

4.12

3.73

MATHEMATICS

HL

18

17

12

5.65

5.12

4.42

4.41

4.43

4.46

MATHEMATICS

SL

23

20

17

5.55

5.37

5.35

4.48

4.44

4.38

FURTHER STUDIES

In recent years, Vilnius Lyceum IB diploma programme graduates have attended the following universities:

Vilnius University

University College London

Vilnius Gediminas Technical University

London School of Economics

ISM University of Management and Economics

University of Aberdeen

Vytautas Magnus University Kaunas

University of Bath

Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Kaunas

University of Bristol

Lithuanian Academy of Theatre and Music

Durham University

Lithuanian Arts Academy

Essex University

SSE Riga

University of Edinburgh

Bocconi University (Milan)

University of Glasgow

University of Applied Sciences, Helsinki

University of St Andrews

The Hague University of Applied Sciences

University of Manchester

Haaga-Helia

University of Sheffield

University of Amsterdam

University of Warwick

Maastricht University

University of York

Erasmus University Rotterdam

Institut d‘etudes politiques du Paris/Sciences Po

Delft University of Technology

Vienna University

Geneva University

University of Oxford

Imperial College London

King’s College London

(c) Vilniaus licėjus, Autoriai